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    • Composite connecting rods spreading into the aftermarket - Extreme Tuners carbon fiber Mitsubishi Evo connecting rods good for 3000+ horsepower

      Remember back in 2018 when composite (carbon fiber) connecting rods debuted at SEMA? They retailed for $18,000.00 and the idea was for a drag racing team to buy a set as it would cut down on costs eventually and be much more reliable.


      Why? Because metal expands and fatigues under stress and temperature. Imagine a set of rods you never have to replace no matter what you throw at the motor.

      There is a limit of course but that limit is very, very high. Extreme Tuners claims their Mitsubishi Evo application can take 3000+ horsepower and over 15,000 rpm:

      Quote Originally Posted by Extreme Tuners
      Our new Carbon Composite rods for our Mitsubishi evo. 77grm weight. 10 times lower weight than steel and 6.5 times lower than aluminum. Tensile strength over 2600mpa

      Designed for +15.000rpm and over 3000hp.

      We will test them on the dyno in few days.

      Like we told, we are going to abandon the CNC technology, our Gen3 pistons and rods are already in testing procedure. Gen3 pistons and rods will be an evolution in automotive and motorsport. Additive manufacturing, 3D printed Ceramics and 3D printed titanium alloy and carbon will replace Gen2 CNC materials.
      BoostAddict thought we would see composite engine materials fairly soon but not this quickly. Imagine if you could order set of composite rods for your motor right now.

      The rotating assembly would be lightened by quite a bit and would be much stronger and more reliable.

      How much money? Extreme Tuners does not say and to be fair some people have questioned their big claims over the years (including doctored videos).

      Expect more big names to get in on composite applications and as with carbon fiber wheels, we will see an OEM deliver composite rods at some point.


      This article was originally published in forum thread: Composite connecting rods spreading into the aftermarket - Extreme Tuners carbon fiber Mitsubishi Evo connecting rods good for 3000+ horsepower started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 10 Comments
      1. subaru335i's Avatar
        subaru335i -
        Yeah Im glad you mention it but I personally don't believe a single thing Extreme Tunas puts out.

        Their name is $#@! from all the outright lies and bull$#@! they have spewed over the years. Spiro that owns the company is a terrible person.
        Their evo is actually pretty fast now but they 100% lied through their teeth about it for years and years.

        I would wait until literally anyone else starts selling carbon fiber rods lol. But the idea is awesome. Reducing rotating weight helps exponentially for high RPM and keeping things together.

        To me, these pictures Extreme Tunas put out of their "carbon fiber" rods just look like 3d printed plastic which would fit with their MO. All of the lattice structure should be perfectly straight members to take tension and compression but in the pictures up close they look like bent spaghetti noodles.
        Also, for carbon fiber rods, they are already going to be way lighter than a metal rod why would they need to make them a lattice anyway? They do not look strong enough to actually put up with real engine loads.
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by subaru335i Click here to enlarge
        Yeah Im glad you mention it but I personally don't believe a single thing Extreme Tunas puts out.

        Their name is $#@! from all the outright lies and bull$#@! they have spewed over the years. Spiro that owns the company is a terrible person.
        Their evo is actually pretty fast now but they 100% lied through their teeth about it for years and years.

        I would wait until literally anyone else starts selling carbon fiber rods lol. But the idea is awesome. Reducing rotating weight helps exponentially for high RPM and keeping things together.

        To me, these pictures Extreme Tunas put out of their "carbon fiber" rods just look like 3d printed plastic which would fit with their MO. All of the lattice structure should be perfectly straight members to take tension and compression but in the pictures up close they look like bent spaghetti noodles.
        Also, for carbon fiber rods, they are already going to be way lighter than a metal rod why would they need to make them a lattice anyway? They do not look strong enough to actually put up with real engine loads.
        I agree with everything you said.

        The main thing is actual applications for our motors. When Carillo or Pauter does it I'll believe it.
      1. Flinchy's Avatar
        Flinchy -
        Top image, bottom journal, doesn't line up

        These are 3d printed PLA

        Working for them tho, their annual/semi annual bull$#@! claims getting them viral... Again.

        They're good at it at least, credit where credit due
      1. Bowser330's Avatar
        Bowser330 -
        While these exact rods may not be the answer, the idea of lightweight engine internals would make the engine more efficient since it reduces rotating mass.
      1. 3DMetal's Avatar
        3DMetal -
        LOL - What a sad attempt at marketing with lies.

        I'm so happy to see the people here are sharp enough, and calling out this B.S.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Picture mated to crank:

        Click here to enlarge
      1. F87Source's Avatar
        F87Source -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Remember back in 2018 when composite (carbon fiber) connecting rods debuted at SEMA? They retailed for $18,000.00 and the idea was for a drag racing team to buy a set as it would cut down on costs eventually and be much more reliable.


        Why? Because metal expands and fatigues under stress and temperature. Imagine a set of rods you never have to replace no matter what you throw at the motor.

        There is a limit of course but that limit is very, very high. Extreme Tuners claims their Mitsubishi Evo application can take 3000+ horsepower and over 15,000 rpm:



        BoostAddict thought we would see composite engine materials fairly soon but not this quickly. Imagine if you could order set of composite rods for your motor right now.

        The rotating assembly would be lightened by quite a bit and would be much stronger and more reliable.

        How much money? Extreme Tuners does not say and to be fair some people have questioned their big claims over the years (including doctored videos).

        Expect more big names to get in on composite applications and as with carbon fiber wheels, we will see an OEM deliver composite rods at some point.

        Concept is great especially the weight savings, durability, and the fact you don't need to replace them. This is huge because built motors imo have never lasted more than 80,000 km before the heat cycling causes piston slap to be a huge issue on start up. Like my sti's always had issues post 80,000km on built motors probably because cold starts are terrible in Canada during the winters.

        Overall good concept, sketchy company imo.
      1. Eleventeen's Avatar
        Eleventeen -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by F87Source Click here to enlarge
        Concept is great especially the weight savings, durability, and the fact you don't need to replace them. This is huge because built motors imo have never lasted more than 80,000 km before the heat cycling causes piston slap to be a huge issue on start up. Like my sti's always had issues post 80,000km on built motors probably because cold starts are terrible in Canada during the winters.

        Overall good concept, sketchy company imo.
        Piston slap on a performance engine probably has more to do with the piston clearance that was spec’d than accelerated wear. With forged pistons and a boosted engine, clearances are increased to better compensate for piston expansion at operating temps.
      1. F87Source's Avatar
        F87Source -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eleventeen Click here to enlarge
        Piston slap on a performance engine probably has more to do with the piston clearance that was spec’d than accelerated wear. With forged pistons and a boosted engine, clearances are increased to better compensate for piston expansion at operating temps.
        Yup that too, however during the beginning I would never experience any piston slap until the motor got old.
      1. spdracerut's Avatar
        spdracerut -
        Way back in the day, Extreme Tuners took a picture of a Garrett compressor wheel that Garrett made and photoshopped it bigger saying ET had machined a new larger wheel.